The Future of Information Processing is Quantum

Putting Quantum Computers to Work

The Duke Quantum Center is a unique “vertical” quantum institute that conducts research on the entire stack of a quantum information system. We’ve pioneered the world’s leading quantum information processing architecture, so rather than focusing solely on theoretical questions or experimental research with quantum components, we’re co-designing the entire quantum information stack, from qubit components and control of entangling operations up to applications and algorithms — plus everything in between.

A Unique Approach
to an Emerging Technology

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Research Areas

Recent News

Two headshots and the IonQ logo

Duke Technology Powers First Pure-Play Quantum Computing Company to Wall Street

Born from a 15-year-long collaboration between Duke University faculty members in engineering and physics, IonQ will become the first publicly traded company focused solely on quantum computing. The company on March 8 announced it had entered into a merger agreement with dMY Technology Group, Inc. III (NYSE: DMYI.U), a publicly traded special purpose acquisition company… Read More »Duke Technology Powers First Pure-Play Quantum Computing Company to Wall Street

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Iman Marvian, Jungsang Kim and Kenneth Brown in Kim's lab in The Chesterfield building in downtown Durham

‘More Possibilities Than There Are Particles in the Universe’

Jungsang Kim was a bit of an anomaly at Duke when he joined the faculty in 2004. Fresh out of the telecommunications industry, and with a PhD in physics from Stanford, Kim soon filled his new Duke lab in electrical and computer engineering with delicate, complex constructions marrying physics and engineering: reconfigurable optical systems whose… Read More »‘More Possibilities Than There Are Particles in the Universe’

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Chris Monroe headshot in black and white on a blue background

Chris Monroe: Realizing Ion-Trap Quantum Computers to Solve Unsolvable Problems

An international leader in quantum computing, architect of the U.S. National Quantum Initiative, and member of the National Academy of Sciences, Chris Monroe will join longtime long-distance collaborators at Duke to build practical quantum computers for use in fields from finance to pharmaceuticals. Chris Monroe, one of the world’s leading experts in trapping atoms and… Read More »Chris Monroe: Realizing Ion-Trap Quantum Computers to Solve Unsolvable Problems

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